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    Monday, August 13, 2012

    Enterovirus infection and type I diabetes mellitus: systematic review and meta-analysis of observational molecular studies

     
    Type I diabetes: A virus that causes a host of ailments ranging from mild respiratory illnesses to meningitis and polio was found to be associated with the development of type I diabetes, especially in children under 5, according to a meta-analysis in the British Medical Journal. The global incidence of type I diabetes has been steadily increasing, particularly the juvenile form of the disease. Previous studies have associated enterovirus infections with type I diabetes and pre-diabetes autoimmunity but the findings weren't conclusive. In this study, Australian researchers analyzed 24 studies and two abstracts published from 1965 to 2010 that involved a combined total of 4,448 subjects who had undergone molecular testing for enteroviruses. They found type I diabetics were almost 10 times as likely to have had a recent enterovirus infection as non-diabetics and to experience persistent enterovirus infections. Children with recent enterovirus infections had three times higher risk for pre-diabetes. Researchers recommended further studies of the environmental, geographical and genetic factors believed to play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes.
    Caveat: Other factors that weren't measured may have influenced the risk of developing diabetes, such as cow's milk, vitamin D and weight gain in infancy, researchers said. Also, there was uneven reporting among the various studies of the methodology used to detect enteroviruses.

    Please remember, as with all our articles we provide information, not medical advice. For any treatment of your own medical condition you must visit your local doctor, with or without our article[s]. These articles are not to be taken as individual medical advice.Please remember, as
    with all our articles we provide information, not medical advice. For any treatment of your own medical condition you must visit your local doctor, with or without our article[s]. These articles are not to be taken as individual medical advice.

    Deepen your understanding of "medical malpractice"... www.MedMalBook.com

    For more health info and links visit the author's web site www.hookman.com

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